North Sterling State Park Mini-Hikes | Colorado | 04/18/20

 


Balanced Rock Trail | North Sterling State Park

Sterling, CO | 04/18/20| 0.34 miles | 45′ gain


The goal was to find a place to hike with as few people as possible (due to coronavirus). Heading east (the opposite direction of the mountains) is a surefire way to avoid anything that could even resemble a crowd. North Sterling State Park boasts miles of trails (plus it’s a decent drive) so we easily filled up an entire day.

I have an annual state park pass so Kyle and I were able to drive directly to the trailhead without stopping to pay a day use fee. I’d researched the various trails within the state park, and while we wouldn’t be able to finish all of them in one day, we could finish all of the shorter ones. I was most excited for the 1/4 mile Balanced Rock Trail as it was supposed to have a pretty cool fossil. That was our first stop.

DSC_0695
The entirety of the Balanced Rock Trail in one picture. (Balanced Rock is on the small hill.)
DSC_0699
This fossilized lower jaw is from a Brontothere; a nine foot tall, five ton, rhino-like animal that inhabited the area about 34-35 million years ago.
DSC_0700
The northeastern plains of Colorado
DSC_0703
Balanced Rock

Dam Trail | North Sterling State Park

Sterling, CO | 04/18/20| 2.54 miles | 14′ gain


Dam_Trail

We next walked south from the Balanced Rock Trailhead on the Dam Trail. This trail follows the entire North Sterling Reservoir Dam before turning west and ending in the boat launch parking lot. The boat launch was closed so we walked all the way to the boat ramp to let Bob go for a swim.

DSC_0713
North Sterling Reservoir Dam

The dam was constructed in 1911 to supply irrigation water to the surrounding farmland. It took two years and 1,500 mules and horses (plus their humans) to excavate the reservoir and build the mile-long dam. This area is semi-arid and without supplemental irrigation, crops would not survive. Today, the reservoir supplies water to 41,000 acres of nearby cropland.

DSC_0717
You can JUST see Balanced Rock in the distance left of center. The dam extends to the right.
DSC_0718
Bob had fun playing fetch on the boat ramp.

South End Trails | North Sterling State Park

Sterling, CO | 04/18/20| 2.95 miles | 115′ gain


Campground_Loop

Just south of the dam are a number of short trails. (The state park calls these the South End Trails.) They don’t technically connect but we were able to make a decent loop out of all of them by occasionally following and crossing various campground roads.

We parked at Sunset Cove and had a quick lunch. After studying the map, we decided to head north on the Swim Beach Trail first. This trail leads from Sunset Cove past the Swim Beach and continues around another large cove before dead-ending at a day use parking lot.

DSC_0721
Sunset Cove
DSC_0724
Swim Beach Trail
DSC_0730
American White Pelican (right of center)
DSC_0731
This is the Swim Beach, if you can believe it!

The swim beach was completely underwater. I wonder what it looks like in summer! We continued around a forested cove. This was a really interesting area, almost like a swamp. The waves on the reservoir broke at the first line of trees, keeping the water towards the back of the cove nice and calm. This area clearly provides a ton of habitat for birds, as the sheer sound of them singing and squawking was deafening. It felt like we were in the jungle. How does this even exist in northeastern Colorado?

DSC_0733

DSC_0734
Calm waters towards the back of the cove.
DSC_0736
The end of the Swim Beach Trail

From the end of the Swim Beach Trail, we had to backtrack a short ways before connecting with the Chimney View Trail at the opposite side of the Swim Beach parking lot. We crossed a road and soon reached the Chimney View Campground. We were still in the beginning of lockdown and all campgrounds were closed. It was a little eerie walking around this huge campground with no one around. We wandered around the campsites and headed east to pick up the Amphitheater Trail. This is a short trail that leads from one parking lot to another (and to an amphitheater) and then we walked west through the also empty Inlet Grove Campground. Wandering through empty campgrounds isn’t exactly my favorite thing in the world, but then we reached the Shooting Star Trail and it became a bit more scenic again.

DSC_0742
The start of the Shooting Star Trail in Inlet Grove Campground

We followed the Shooting Star Trail up a small hill and connected with the Red Fox and Sunset Point Trails. These form two small loops at the top of the hill that provide good views of the reservoir.

DSC_0744
Almost to Sunset Point
DSC_0750
Sunset Point
DSC_0751
Cliffs along the Sunset Point Trail

After looping around Sunset Point, we crossed another parking lot to connect with the Sunset Cove Trail which led us back to our car. North Sterling is definitely not the most scenic or exciting state park in Colorado, but it was worth the drive to avoid the crowds and explore a pretty unique area!


Chelsea


 

23 thoughts on “North Sterling State Park Mini-Hikes | Colorado | 04/18/20

  1. Definitely different than some of your other hikes that I’ve looked at, but no less interesting! Bob looks like he’s an avid hiker too. My daughter has a collie/blue heeler mix and they are sure smart dogs…rascals too πŸ™‚

    Like

  2. Mini hikes are the best!!! They get you out there and moving and seeing nature without feeling the crunch of having to push big miles. Its just a number. The experience is what matters!

    BTW- Bob is AWESOME!!!

    -Michael

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s